May 29, 2016

Vlax

Expressive illustrations. Satirical views on our digital society. I...

Expressive illustrations. Satirical views on our digital society.
It we step out of our digital bobble, turn around and look inn, what would we see?

We are letting the digital life take control over us. I red an article posted by Anonymiss yesterday about what it's like to grow up in the age of likes, lols and longing. The essential bit was that the smartphone is the place where all our friends are always hanging out, so it's the place where we are, too. But is it voluntary? We are after all living in a increasingly sophisticated attention economy. It is becoming harder and harder to resist, to opt out. In many nations there are rules that says it's illegal to have direct, aimed marketing to children because they are so susceptible to what they see. The world of social media, applications and such acts in the same way but under the radar and far more omnipresent. It lures us all, we get hooked on it, crave more and more. Where are our protection against this? Where are our protection against the demand for our attention? We are giving ourselves away for free at the highest cost.

These expressive illustrations are the work of Brecht Vandenbroucke http://brechtvandenbroucke.blogspot.no/
#Illustration #Satire #Social #Critic #SocialMedia #Online #DigitalLife #BrechtVandenbroucke

May 28, 2016

Evgeny Morozov

The celebrity privacy case that exposes hypocrisy of Silicon Valley power brokers

Tech companies talk about the free flow of information but their owners use their wealth to block any intrusion into their personal lives

Ours is a world where a handful of technology companies – along with a considerably higher number of their billionaire owners – are heading towards power that will border on the absolute, uncontested not just by politics but also by the media of any kind.

Two seemingly unrelated recent news stories make it quite clear. First, a report from Moody’s Investors Service suggests that just five US tech firms – Apple, Microsoft, Google, Cisco and Oracle – hold $504bn (£345bn) in spare cash, a third of total reserves by all US corporations (excluding financial companies). It is the first time that all of the top five spots have gone to companies in the tech sector.

Related: Gawker denied new trial in Hulk Hogan sex-tape lawsuit

Continue reading...

by Evgeny Morozov

May 27, 2016

Informatic school is in southwest Cameroon

Linux Friends Presenting their hardware on the 20th of May 2016

 

Linux Friends presenting raspberry Pi3 on the 20th of May 2016.

Patrick Baumann we thank you very much for supporting Linux Friends with raspberry Pi3 computers

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Thank you very Much Anton Wuest for our Custume, Linux friends is looking good because you made it.

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Linux Friends Presenting their hardware on the 20th of May 2016 in Limbe

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Linux Friends Limbe presenting how raspberry Pi3 computers and Solar Energy works.

 

 

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Anton Wuest  We thank you very much for the costume. Linux Friends in Limbe is looking good because you did it.

linux2 linux3 linux4 DSC00380

by admin

Decentralized Citizen Engagement Technologies

Networks, technologies and open, collaborative narrative

Writer: Eva Rueda

From the Hackathon for Democracy to D-CENT Project’s ground-breaking undertakings and the creation of Red de Comunes Democráticos (Democratic Commons Network), four days at MediaLab Prado were packed with sharing, surveying, debating, and suggesting ideas as to where the world is heading regarding direct democracy, citizen participation, commons networks, and open source software. Techno-politics, new urban models, social innovation, and apps and platforms to share and invigorate around #DemocracyLab. From tomorrow on, the event #DemocraticCities moves to the Reina Sofía with presentations by over 30 leading politicians and activists.

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Rethinking democracy. It’s been four days, one hundred participants, five working teams (organization, political thinking, technology, communication, facilitation and media center), lots of collaboratively written TitanPads and, above all, a lot of ideas and willingness. The Democratic Commons Network has been set up! It was created somewhere between MediaLab’s Prado Auditorium and Bar, from Monday until today, Thursday, in a run of sessions in which Telegram channels, created as a means of communication, have been literally fuming.

What is the Network of Democratic Commons? “We’re people from different cities that, from 2015, organize ourselves online in an open, horizontal, transparent, and reconfigurable manner. We want a society that is completely democratic in every aspect, boosted by the opportunities afforded by online collaboration and work, both digitally and face-to-face. How do we do it? By creating, liberating and sharing organizational models, technologies, practices, legal material, narratives, and open resources that configure collaborative participation in democratic ways.”

Don’t miss the campaign launch event that will be held in the next few days!

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Hackers for Democracy

Coding Democracy has taken place on two consecutive days, Wednesday and Thursday. It consisted in a hackathon to contribute to the biggest participation open source tool now available in Spain: Consul (used by decide.madrid.es and exported and adapted to other municipalities). Expert developers from Madrid’s City Council led this informative workshop.

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And as a closing event for #DemocracyLab, one of the two cornerstones of the Democratic Cities gathering, this afternoon we’ve held D-CENT Project: Technologies and Institutions for the 21st Century, where eight international speakers have addressed new and different ways of democracy-building around the world. They’ve also introduced electronic voting experimental tools (Agora Voting, Freecoin, Dyne.org, etc.).

Andreas Karitzis, development consultant and independent researcher, along with researcher Paolo Gerbaudo, have analyzed contemporary citizen movements and digital culture. Gerbaudo, director of London’s Kings College Digital Culture Centre, has advocated for a thought-provoking division between “techno-populism” (referendum oriented) and “citizenism” (bottom-up). And so the audience began debating: “Progressive governments want to work bottom-up but they don’t trust models that try to catalyze collective intelligence. That’s why we must make headway fast in collective intelligence organizations.”

Francesca Bria, coordinator of the EU’s D-CENT Project (the largest direct democracy and digital currency project in Europe), was also resounding: “One cannot govern along with technological companies that trade our personal information.”

Decentralized citizens and engaged technologies. For a direct democracy and economic empowerment.

Friday and Saturday we’ll meet in Madrid’s Reina Sofía.

Photo gallery of #DemocracyLab’s 26th May session

Social media hashtag #DemocraticCities

*****

Article translated by Georgina Reparado, edited by Susa Oñate – Guerrilla Translation

Original article published at: http://democratic-cities.cc/networks-technologies-and-open-collaborative-narratives

by admin

May 26, 2016

Decentralized Citizen Engagement Technologies

From the squares to decentralized politics

Writer: Eva Rueda

From Paris to Iceland, Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and Spain. Researchers, municipal technicians and activists from different countries have shared their new batch of direct democracy strategies, open source software, and citizen participation, in the context of Democracy Lab, at the Democratic Cities: Commons Technology and Right to a Democratic City gathering organized by the D-CENT Project and Madrid’s Town Council.

“We’re talking about an interconnected, global cycle of civil disturbances between 2010 and 2016 that are re-shaping collective communication.” “We are saying that conventional social theories on mobilization are no longer viable.” It was with these words that Javier Toret–researcher and 15-M activist–opened the session “Techno-Politics and Web Movements: From 15-M to Nuit Debout,” the first of a series of talks at Democracy Lab, the participative section of the conference Democratic Cities: Commons Technology and the Right to a Democratic City. The event will be held in MediaLab Prado until Thursday, May 26th; it will revolve around democratic innovation and recent participatory technologies and will conclude at the Reina Sofía Museum on Friday the 27th and Saturday the 28th, with an international conference and the intervention of leading politicians and activists.

Egypt (Arab Spring), Tunisia, Mexico, Spain (15-M), Hong Kong (#OccupyHonkKong, #UmbrellaMovement), United States (Occupy), Brazil and now France (Nuit Debout). “We are dealing with citizens’ movements and collective identities in connected societies, in which the concept of techno-politics lies in the understanding of this new reality as well as the strategic vision and tactical use of digital tools for a collective dynamics.” “What we’re saying is that we’ve got to make an effort and learn from science about mobilization and cooperation models.”

Toret shared time, space and presentation with Baki Youssoufou, member and activist of the recent French movement Nuit Debout, who explained to a captivated audience the development and use of communication and technology during the current upheaval in the Place de la Republique in Paris. The Spanish activist brought up questions such as How are emotions spread on – and offline?, What do the connections between the web and the brain look like?, along with observations regarding the course of action from the streets to the web to mass media. “We’ve learnt to concentrate our energies on the street layer, but we’re not present in our countries’ mass media until we show up in the Washington Post.”

Everything adds up when it comes to techno-political practices: “Every single upheaval has kept major fan pages, Facebook events have also been of great importance, Twitter has enabled us to align collective action in real time, and streaming is the live revolution because it allows us to build mobilization in real time.”

NUIT DEBOUT (which literally means “Up All Night”) has had a strong connection with the 15-M. Yossoufou narrated on Monday, in MediaLab Prado’s Auditorium, the way in which the movement is communicating its own story without intermediaries. “The mainstream media showed nothing but the conflicts, so we decided to create our own Media Center,” which is coordinated via Telegram, and where we’re developing a communication strategy based on an alternative discourse to that of the media. “Based on the experience of the 15-M, said Youssoufou, we decided to transmit what we are and what we do in Nuit Debout via Twitter as a source of information to journalists.” Actually, the first mention of the upheaval on the French media came from a storify in Le Monde that picked live tweets from journalists.


Baki Youssoufou, activist and member of the current French movement Nuit Debout.

WikiNuitDebout is another of the unequivocal tools presented: all the existing information about the movement, the actions in every city and committee, social media, working tools, proposals, ideas and inquiries are all gathered in this collaborative platform. As Baki Youssoufou explains, although Nuit Debout rose as a protest to the Labor Law reform known as El Khomri Law, the movement relies on a broad social base and intends to “change it all.” “We are staring at a new type of democracy, in which independence is much greater. And awareness is being raised.”

Gunnar Grímsson

Gunnar Grímsson, CEO, Citizens Foundation. Photo: La Manada

Artificial Intelligence to raise citizen engagement

So, where exactly is the international citizen participation debate heading? This is what Twitter users were asking yesterday. Gunnar Grímsson, CEO, Citizens Foundation (Reykjavik, Iceland), showed CF’s huge achievements: 600,000 people have used its tools, apps and software in order to improve electronic democracy in several countries.

He also assured that apathy is today’s great problem. “Except when people are very upset, the hardest thing is to have them show up and be engaged,” Grímsson said in Madrid. “The core question is to get citizens to participate: that’s the major challenge in every crowd-sourcing project.”

Citizens Foundation works to improve citizens’ democratic processes. They have recently launched a new version of the Your Priorities software, which allows for the creation of communities and groups for civil participation around any issue in a simple and rapid manner.

Grímsson described the participatory process in Iceland, as well as the set of digital tools that were developed, giving the interface a major significance and clearly betting on artificial intelligence (AI) and on the use of more sophisticated tools that could be used to interact off- and online. He supports the argument that “the digital is new but it is not a substitute for the analogical,” and accordingly defends an offline/online combination with the trio: brainstorm online, evaluate offline and vote on- and offline. He also made his claim for open source, free and transparent software.

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One of the working groups of the Democratic Commons Network Workshop in MediaLab Prado, Madrid

Spanish laws restrict civil and political participation

And from Iceland to Spain, the four speakers of the session “Direct Democracy: Legal Strategies for Local Implementation” concurred in openly questioning the existing legal boundaries over direct democracy processes. Gregorio Planchuelo, form the Madrid City Council, highlighted that “citizen participation is quite limited by our laws. In order to seek any information, you need a Government authorization, which can take a whole term.”

According to the jurist Francisco Jurado, neither the People’s Right of Initiative (ILP, Iniciativa Legislativa Popular) nor the referendum can be considered direct political participation formulas. Jurado criticized the “futility” of the motions in which representatives invest so much of their time even though “they end up being good for nothing.” He also announced that the Andalusian Parliament is working to transform the People’s Right of Initiative into a People’s Initiative Action for the co-creation of laws. “Legislation is quite obsolete and we are trying to go around restrictions and update democracy for the 21st century,” Jurado declared.

Amaia Aguirreolea, in charge of the Participation Department of Donostia-San Sebastián, told how the first thing they did when getting this department under way was to “explore this thing called direct democracy.” Juan Carlos Madroñal, Founder of Más Democracia, concluded: “It’s overtly absurd that a city council should need government permission when it intends to propose a referendum. It doesn’t happen anywhere in the world.”

Movements, citizenship, and politics in Brazil, Mexico and Colombia

Latin-American participatory experience has been around for a long time. The session “Latin America: Participation and Techno-Political Innovation” tried to break down the unilateral perspective. Marcelo Branco, a long standing activist put forward a historical development of the participative processes in Porto Alegre (Brazil), and concluded: “Without direct participatory democracy and citizen empowerment, governments are hostage to parliamentary alliances and corrupt politicians.”

Marcelo Branco

Marcelo Branco, activist from Porto Alegre, Brazil. Photo: La Manada

This session made public innovating experiences such as the world’s first School of Political Innovation (Escuela de Innovación Política), an Open Government project of the State of Nariño (Colombia), or Wikipolítica, a political organization without party affiliations that has developed an interesting participatory political process in Jalisco, Mexico. Diego Arredondo, in charge of Wikipolítica’s communication and technology, narrated the case of Pedro Kumamoto’s new way of making politics by way of the community. Or Natascha Symanksi, São Paulo’s Digital Hub designer, who highlighted that not just governments but also citizens must understand technology as a political strategy

In Democratic Cities event we are re-thinking democracy by means of the new digital approaches and always taking the human aspect into account. Movements that are local but also global. Free, connected, and coordinated cities to advance citizen participation. Collective intelligence movements that are setting a democratic lead around the globe.

*****

Article translated by Georgina Reparado, edited by Susa Oñate – Guerrilla Translation

Original article published at: http://democratic-cities.cc/from-the-squares-to-decentralized-politics

by admin

Projects and tools that will open democracy

Writer: Eva Rueda

“The best open source tool is affectivity.” This isn’t an ordinary saying in an ordinary context. Its author, Diego, of the Todo por la Praxis collective, spoke at the session Urban Betas: Tools for an Open Source City that took place yesterday afternoon in #DemocracyLab, the international section of #DemocraticCities that is being held in MediaLab Prado. #DemocraticCities is a global gathering space that aims to improve democracy with open, collaborative technologies.

What does city-building mean? Is there any other way to organize a city? How can we make public things more public? Adolfo Estalella, anthropologist and researcher, tossed around these questions for which there aren’t closed answers yet, only open doors: “Urbanism is no longer in the hands of architects and experts but it’s being designed by citizens themselves through the collection of tools and recycled materials.”

The main goal of this interesting, intense session was to explore the material and documentary sources that make a city amenable for its inhabitants. We met different urban projects such as Red de Arquitecturas Colectivas (Collective Architecture Network), ARchive TAZ (an observatory that collects experiences from citizen-organized spaces: from urban gardens to community centres to cultural spaces), Vivero de Iniciativas Ciudadanas (Citizen Initiative Incubator), Caseando (open-city housing tool for collectives), the mapping platform CIVICS, Ciudad Escuela, the Civicwise platform that connects citizens, Territoris Oblidats (Forgotten Territories), Ciudad Huerto (an educational itinerary that collects experiences and knowledge from Madrid’s urban community gardens), Mapa de los Madriles (Madrid Map), Red de Espacios Ciudadanos (REC, Citizen Spaces Network), or MICOS: school-based micro-interventions (that transform children’s spaces in a collaborative manner). These are all tools that refresh our relationship with all things urban: city maps, urban archives and city strolls, hand-made furniture, citizen infrastructure, digital platforms, and drafts of cities.

So, given that cities can build themselves up, Estalella pointed out, vacant lots have been opened for cultivation and empty city spaces made available to citizen’s creativity. Not only is this manual urbanism handcrafted, but it also produces the manuals themselves that document the process, thus liberating knowledge.

What does city-building mean?, the researcher and anthropologist Alberto Cosín kept wondering in Urban Betas. The concept of the new city implies a huge new challenge: New property forms, the idea of the commons, and new license and technology mechanisms. “We’ve learnt a lot concerning licenses in the open source sphere –Corsín said–, but questions such as secondary civil liability have not yet been resolved: We must come up with cooperative systems that can ensure these infrastructures.” Cities are very complex objects where technical and urban aspects as well as digital technologies intermingle. And free tools are not just to be used in public spaces, but also in our homes.

“Things happen because people get together and share,” said one of the promoters of Red de Espacios Ciudadanos. “Can you imagine democratic cities with spaces available for citizens and guarantees for everyone?,” asked a Twitter user during the debate. In the Urban Betas session there was a clear need for urbanizing democracy in squares, gardens and mundane infrastructures with different property regimes, open infrastructure and collective documentation. A clear need to create an urban activism that will ignore neither the old ways of city-building nor the need to interconnect it with common technology.

The path is being drawn up, from the squares to our homes. Some have already begun to think the city with languages beyond text or words. This is the new urban pedagogy, built of knowledge that becomes power.

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From Korea to Berlin, Projects to Build a Citizen’s Politics

Centralized, decentralized, and distributed power were also debated in the Unconference on open democracy and a decentralized internet that took place yesterday and continues today, Thursday, in MediaLab Prado’s Auditorium. In a dynamic manner, every participant –from Korea, Berlin, London, Madrid, and Barcelona– briefly presented their project. A total of 14 initiatives were shared throughout the day in hands-on workshops organized collaboratively. There were apps, tools and open source software that emphasized the improvement of citizen empowerment processes, decentralized power, privacy and human rights.

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From strategies to foster the active involvement of citizens through crowdsourcing, apps to re-imagine and improve your city (Hackity App), and open source decision-making tools for massive groups (BaoQu) to data and research journalism platforms (Pattrn), a personal server prepared to free you from spying services (FreedomBox) or a real time, collaborative API and text editor (Swellrt.org).

These are projects that aim to improve cities and make them more open and democratic. Redecentralize.org, a project that intends to unite communities interested in decentralization, presents itself this way: “Silently, some geeks are decentralizing the web. Who are they? Why are they doing it? What new technologies are they using? How is that changing the world?

Photo gallery of #DemocracyLab’s 25th May session.

Social media: #DemocraticCities

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Article translated by Georgina Reparado, edited by Susa Oñate – Guerrilla Translation

Original article published at: http://democratic-cities.cc/projects-and-tools-that-will-open-democracy

by admin

May 25, 2016

Annamaria Monteverdi

Martha Colburn-stop motion art

Note da ArsKey Magazine “Martha Colburn, con Dolls VS Dictators, si focalizza sul materiale che documenta l’uccisione di dittatori nel corso della storia. Ma non si tratta di un racconto di pura documentazione, ma di una contaminazione visionaria, in cui la tecnica dello stop-motion inserisce bambole e marionette; ne nasce uno scenario surreale, in cui […]

by annamaria monteverdi

Lepage link a video

Link a video in rete http://www.youtube.com/user/leprojetexmachina E la galleria video dal sito ufficiale di Ex machina http://lacaserne.net/index2.php/exmachina/gallery_video/ Qua gli articoli pubblicati su ATEATRO sui suoi spettacoli: http://www.ateatro.org/mostravoce2.asp?alfabeto=lepageRobert THE BLUE DRAGON (2008) Sequel de La trilogie des dragons. httpv://www.youtube.com/user/leprojetexmachina#p/a/u/1/9BnvpW5Iwvw BUSKER’S OPERA (Da L’opera da tre soldi di Brecht) Jeux de cartes La face caché de la […]

by annamaria monteverdi

May 24, 2016

Decentralized Citizen Engagement Technologies

Open call results: Great interest in the Democracy Lab Unconference in Madrid

As part of the Democracy Lab that started on Monday in Madrid, we organise a two-day Unconference from Wednesday to Thursday (25-26 May). This event dives into Initiatives for open democracy and a decentralised Internet. Through an Open Call, we looked for groups and individuals to contribute to the sessions. Now we are very happy to introduce some of chosen participants!

The Democracy Lab Unconference (25-26 May) will include lightning talks, hands on workshops and presentations selected and scheduled by attendees on the day.

Our recent Open Call was looking for groups and individuals to contribute to the sessions. It produced the amazing 60 competing proposals from different disciplines, all very promising.

We are now happy to introduce some of chosen participants, please see the list below. They are all pioneers in launching new digital democracy tools or starting a discussion understanding citizen rights from a different perspectives, using the opportunities given by new media.

The Unconference format enables you to meet and chat with these thought leaders.

1. Sofía de Roa

Sofía de Roa is a Spanish journalist. She studied Political Campaign at Ortega-Marañon Institute, and Digital Citizienship, Culture and Comunication at Madrid’s Media Lab Prado and Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, to research on how to improve the democracy at political parties, allowing public scrutiny and participation, by introducing new forms of internal operation. In particular, she suggests to implement a Quality Indicators System, a method promoted from Asociación Calidad y Cultura Democráticas, organization where she belongs from 2013. She participated at 15M Movement and municipalist project Ganemos Madrid. Currently, she works at Podemos, developing the transparency system.

2. Oliver Sauter

Oliver Sauter is the founder of the project “WorldBrain – Verifying the Internet with Science”, on the quest against (scientific) misinformation and for scientific literacy. Sauter is an Internet fanboy, thinker and tinker, open-Source and Open Data advocate.

3. Javier de la Cueva

Javier de la Cueva holds a Licentiate degree in Law and is Doctor of Philosophy at the Complutense University of Madrid. He works as a practicing lawyer. Amongst other cases, he has handled the defence of cases related to usage of free intellectual property licenses and diverse technological platforms. Beside his work as a lawyer and as a lecturer, he is currently engaged in programming technological projects, and is a member of the Board of Directors of Fundación Ciudadana Civio.

4. Manuel Rodríguez

Manu Rodriguez is data researcher and sociologist training. His career has been linked to data analysis and technology, he has spent more than 10 years measuring and analysing data for large companies. Rodriguez is a professor at McKinsey Social Initiative and ISDI. He feels great passion for understanding human motivations through research.

5. Philippe Baret

Philippe Baret is a French freelance journalist and online editor, technical and crowd-sourcing editor at FreedomBox, personal cloud server.

6. Elisa Lewis

Elisa Lewis is an expert in civic innovation and entrepreneurship. She has co-founded “Les Cols Verts”, a social enterprise promoting urban agriculture for vulnerable people. She is the vice-president of “Démocratie Ouverte”, a community gathering elected representatives, members of institutions, social entrepreneurs and citizens developing creative solutions to upgrade democracy in the French-speaking world. She is the co-author of a book on democratic innovations around the world (to be published this summer– La Découverte).

7. Joseph Kim

Joseph Kim has co-fouded WAGL and worked as Project Manager for publication job and global networking. Before that he joined Youth Party Korea for the general election in 2012 as one of the Party’s spokesmen and participated Occupy Seoul National University in May 2011. He recently works on proposing a new model of an innovative party or a crowd-sourced political platform based on citizen participation for South Korea.

8. Maro Horta Maro

Horta is a Human Rights lawyer and a passionate of New Technologies that can help those in need to improve their lives. This is why he is focused on the FairCoop project aiming to create a new economic system to reduce inequalities among human beings. In that sense, blockchain and cryptocurrencies are a new development that can help to achieve these goals.

by admin

May 23, 2016

Bordermonitoring.EU

Eviction of Idomeni

Updates from the eviction in Idomeni Statement of Moving Europe: Since heavy clashes between the Greek police and inhabitants of the makeshift camp of Idomeni erupted and most of the people had to experience police violence by tear gas1, the situation in Idomeni has not calmed down. During the weekend, intense rain transformed the camp … Eviction of Idomeni weiterlesen

by ms

May 22, 2016

Annamaria Monteverdi

Happy Birthday Mr LEPAGE

Vent’anni fa Robert Lepage, tra i più grandi registi mondiali, fondata la compagnia multidisciplinare Exmachina 20 anni fa Robert Lepage fondava a Québec city in una ex caserma dei pompieri, la compagnia multidisciplinare Ex Machina. La prima produzione fu l’acclamato “spettacolo-fiume” “The seven streams of the River Ota”, commissionato dal governo giapponese per i 50 anni […]

by annamaria monteverdi

Il palazzo della memoria. La nuova epica orale di 887 di Lepage pre-debutta a Nantes.

E’ prima di tutto una straordinaria prova d’attore questo 887, il nuovissimo solo show con cui Robert Lepage ritorna a recitare sul palcoscenico dopo aver firmato le due regie di Jeux de cartes (Spade e Cuori) ancora in tour, e aver diretto il Ring di Wagner per il Metropolitan di New York la cui versione […]

by annamaria monteverdi

May 21, 2016

Vlax

A Radical Way of Unleashing a #Generation of Geniuses

A Radical Way of Unleashing a #Generation of Geniuses

source: http://www.wired.com/2013/10/free-thinkers/

One day, a burro fell into a well, Juárez Correa began. It wasn’t hurt, but it couldn’t get out. The burro’s owner decided that the aged beast wasn’t worth saving, and since the well was dry, he would just bury both. He began to shovel clods of earth into the well. The burro cried out, but the man kept shoveling. Eventually, the burro fell silent. The man assumed the animal was dead, so he was amazed when, after a lot of shoveling, the burro leaped out of the well. It had shaken off each clump of dirt and stepped up the steadily rising mound until it was able to jump out.

school

Juárez Correa looked at his class. “We are like that burro,” he said. “Everything that is thrown at us is an opportunity to rise out of the well we are in.”

#education #children #school #youth

Annamaria Monteverdi

QUINTESENCE – Live Audio/Visual Performance by Florence To and Ricardo Dono

Per accedere al contenuto scrivi a anna.monteverdi@gmail.com. Se invece sei già in possesso delle credenziali di accesso le puoi inserire ed accede al download.

by annamaria monteverdi

Vlax

#Mexico : #Educacion, #frontera #digital y #pobreza en tiempos del ...

#Mexico : #Educacion, #frontera #digital y #pobreza en tiempos del #capitalismo #cognitivo

  • La escuela primaria José Urbina López está cerca de un basurero al otro lado de la frontera con México. La escuela es para los residentes de #Matamoros, una ciudad polvorienta de 489,000 habitantes, siendo ésta un punto central en la #guerra contra el narcotráfico. Hay balaceras con frecuencia, y es común que los lugareños por la mañana se encuentren con cuerpos tirados por la calle. Para llegar a la #escuela, los estudiantes recorren un camino de terracería que corre paralelo a un canal de aguas negras.

http://www.wired.com/2013/11/aprendizaje-independiente

May 20, 2016

Decentralized Citizen Engagement Technologies

Meet the Madrid organizers

The Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city event is the biggest European event on network democracy, new forms of citizen participation, digital tools for democratic participation and urban commons for democratic cities. Organised on the 23–28 May, we expect 400+ academics, activists, politicians and hackers to attend in Madrid, Spain.

The event activities, spread to 6 days, are organised by a group of organisations working with direct democracy, citizen participation, and bottom-up initiatives.

D-CENT (Decentralized Citizens ENgagement Technologies) is the largest European project on direct democracy. It has created open, secure and privacy-aware tools for direct democracy and economic empowerment. D-CENT has run from October 2013 to May 2016, and it is co-funded by the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and innovation. It comprises a strong international consortium with nine partners from across Europe. The Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city is the final event of the D-CENT project, showcasing and celebrating its results especially in the International conference organised on the 27-28 of May.

NESTA (UK, London) is an independent charity that works to increase the innovation capacity of the UK. The organisation acts through a combination of practical programmes, investment, policy and research, and the formation of partnerships to promote innovation across a broad range of sectors. Nesta is the coordinator of the D-CENT project.

MEDIA-LAB PRADO is a citizen laboratory of production, research and broadcasting of cultural projects that explores the forms of experimentation and collaborative learning that have emerged from digital networks. It is part of the Department of Culture and Sports (former Department of Arts, Sports and Tourism) of the Madrid City Council. Medialab-Prado aims to operate as an open platform that invites and allows users to configure, alter and modify research and production processes. It is the key organization behind the Democracy Lab, organized on the 23-27 May as part of the event Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city.

MUSEO REINA SOFIA (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia) is Spain’s national museum of 20th-century art. Offering a mixture of national and international temporary exhibitions in its many galleries it is one of the world’s largest museums for modern and contemporary art. Museo Reina Sofia is the event venue of the International Conference organized on the 27-28 May as part of the Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city event.

In the last yearMADRID CITY COUNCIL has made a firm commitment to direct democracy, participation and transparency. Through the website Decide Madrid, citizen proposals are collected as well as direct interviews and discussion forums facilitated. The City Council has also launched the most ambitious participatory budget in Europe, through which citizens decide the use of 60 million euros. The objective of the City is to move forward and spread direct democracy beyond the city limits: as such, the free software developed for these participatory processes is available to any institution and administration worldwide.

BARCELONA CITY COUNCIL is committed to participatory, transparent and open democracy involving all social groups and citizens. Among the most recent projects is the participatory development of the Municipal Action Plan and the District Action Plans, for which there have been more than 400 physical meetings and contact with more than 30,000 individuals and associations. This engagement has resulted in more than 10,000 proposals being submitted through Decidim Barcelona. Further evidence of the commitment to participation can be seen through the collaborative production of public policies; community management of resources and municipal facilities; and the commitment to transparency and direct interaction by adopting a mix of new technologies and traditional communication with its citizens. The goal is to build a radically democratic city based on direct participation, open governance, urban commons and collective intelligence.

by admin

Madrid digital participation experiences

Decide Madrid is an open consultation and direct democracy platform launched by the city of Madrid after the recent municipal elections. It enables citizens to propose, debate, prioritise and implement policy for the city.

Decide Madrid is built on software called Consul. Consul is an open source and free software Internet application. That means any other government or organization can easily replicate it. Consul was released on September 2015 in Madrid as Decide Madrid.

Madrid City has made an effort to help other cities to use this new open source technology developed in Madrid. It was replicated in the Oviedo City on December as consultaOviedo.es, and in January in Barcelona as decidim.barcelona. More than 20 cities in Spain are planning to implement it in the following months.

Consul has been inspired by LaboDemo experience in Plaza Podemos. Plaza Podemos is an Internet forum for Podemos party where everyone can debate. Once a proposal gets enough support, it jumps to a binding mechanism where finally there is a general consultation.

Boosting bottom-up participation 

Decide Madrid has been conceived as a bottom-up proposal mechanism where everyone can propose and debate but just people living in Madrid can have a binding support and vote. A deliberative forum is integrated with the citizen proposals mechanism. Until now, more than 15.000 proposals with more than 74.000 comments and 1.688.000 supports have been made. There are between 100.000 and 200.000 different users visits each month and more than 1.300.000 visits in total.

Once a proposal reaches the 2% threshold, a binding consultation will be promoted, and everyone (Madrid residents) will decide if this proposal can turn into action.

First plugin has been released on February and it allows the first participatory budgeting in Madrid: giving 60 millions Euros to be realized by bottom-up citizen proposals. More than 5.000 proposals have been made, some of them from individuals and others coming from collaborative face-to-face meetings in every district. The process to decide which proposals become a reality will be similar to Better Reykjavik in Iceland: people have to fill a budget line adding proposals until they reach the total quantity.

Better Reykjavik is a platform that has been running in the Reykjavik City for six years, and it has enabled hundreds of proposals to become a reality. Since its launch, the website has inspired more than 70,000 people to propose and discuss over 4,200 ideas. Better Reykjavik is created by Citizen Foundation in Iceland, and it is one of three pilots of the D-CENT project.


Join us in Madrid!

On the  23–28 May, D-CENT and collaboration partners are organising the biggest European event on network democracy, new forms of citizen participation, digital tools for democratic participation and urban commons for democratic cities.  The Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city event takes place in Madrid, Spain. Welcome!

>> Read more

by admin

The Next Layer

Art in a Third Space: New Tendencies and the Nonaligned Avant-gardes

This talk “Art in a Third Space” was held at the CAA conference in Washington D.C., February 04 2016, as a part of the panel Non-aligned: Art, Solidarity, and the Emerging “Third World”. The paper presents a condensed investigation of the international art movement and network New Tendencies. Non-alignment, in the context of my talk, refers both to political circumstances but also serves as a metaphor to gain access to a rich transdisciplinary understanding of New Tendencies.

The movement and network New Tendencies began in 1961 in Zagreb, Croatia, which was then part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. After Yugoslav initially has been described as more Stalinist than Stalin, it came to a falling out with the Soviet Union in 1948, which forced Yugoslavia to define its own brand of socialism. Between 1948 and 1951 Yugoslavia developed a new state ideology of self-managed socialism. The path that Yugoslavia took from then on was read as a “third way” between capitalism and socialism. In this lecture I will argue that this created the unique conditions for New Tendencies to emerge. This movement created a “third space” through its activities, which produced a non-aligned art which broke through stereotypes of art in a socialist (and capitalist) context.

Yugoslavia was together with India, Egypt, Indonesia a founding nation of the non-aligned nations movement. The latter became formalized by a declaration signed in Belgrade in 1961, the year of the first New Tendencies exhibition. My thesis is not that New Tendencies was a meeting place of artists from non-aligned nations, but that Yugoslavia, by being non-aligned, offered itself as that meeting ground where neo-avant-gardes from East and West, North and South could come together, physically and also regarding their artistic aims. I posit that those neo-avant-gardes participated in political and artistic-cultural topographies which remain insufficiently explored. Giving due consideration to those non-aligned neo-avant-gardes will result in a qualitatively different map of postwar modernism.

Taking Zagreb as a center, the movement had participants to the East, in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Poland, and even in Russia; looking – from Zagreb - to the West, there were many southern and western European participants, from Spain and Italy, from Germany and France; last not least, there were many participants from Latin America, most of whom lived in Paris at the time. But this map did not only contain different players and regions, out of this matrix developed also a qualitatively different type of art.

As I argue in my book, New Tendencies – Art at the Threshold of the Information Revolution (2016) (Illustration 0), a climate of modernity developed in Latin-American, Western, Southern, and South-Eastern Europe where a “constructive nexus” in arti was linked to a modernization project in politics and social development. Those artworks adopted the visual vocabulary of modern art to formulate a “project,” a modernistic projection of a utopian but attainable future.

Some of the precursors of New Tendencies, such as Exat 51, participated in the creation of a modern image of Yugoslavia at trade fairs through exhibition displays (see illustration 1) and at the Brussels World Expo of 1958 through the pavilion designed by Vjenceslav Richter (see illustration 2)

New Tendencies was from its beginning to the end a formally innovative movement, conducting “visual research” and experimenting with new media such as light and movement. The choice of materials and their aesthetics and poetics was linked to an emancipatory project of creating a better future through rational organisation. Following convincing periodisations by art historians from former Yugoslavia, such as Misko Suvakovic, New Tendencies were a neo-avant-garde movement. While connecting with the concerns of the historical avant-gardes, New Tendencies developed something genuinely new. New Tendencies created a specific politics of form, which needs to be reflected in the context of the historical situation.

Many of the participating artists stemmed from peripheral nations in a catching up process of modernization. The economic example to follow was provided by the USA who emerged from the New Deal in the late 1930s with a new economic model – Keynesian Fordism. This was copied in various ways, not only in the west but also in the Soviet zone of influence in the Khrushchev era. Those projects of modernization were of course each quite different, since each country had specific conditions and circumstances, different economic and political regimes. The processes were also uneven, they happened to be strongest in urban centers and were not evenly distributed among geographies and populations, and precarious – they remained unfinished, as we will later see.

In Latin America, nations such as Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela had not been directly affected by the Second World War. When the war ended, they entered periods of democratization, rapid economic growth and urbanisation. Brazil launched the first modern art biennial outside Europe in 1951, and built its modernistic capital in the middle of the country. Venezuela built the highly ambitious University City of Caracas. Doubt had not yet crept into the modernistic project in those countries, similar to Yugoslavia. Argentine, Brazil, Venezuela and other nations have highly original and genuinely interesting kinetic art movements, but for reasons of space I need to assume that cornerstones of those are well known.

New Tendencies was the result of a chance conversation between the Brazilian painter Almir Mavignier and Zagreb based critic Matko Meštrović. The first exhibition was called New Tendencies in the plural for good reasons. It brought together a diverse range of groups and collectives, as well as individuals. Piero Manzoni is said to have had a strong influence behind the screen. He sent three works, Achrome, one of his “Lines” and a famous can of Merda da Artista (see illustration 3); according to a famous anecdote, the organisers decided not to test the tolerance of the party apparatus by showing the Achrome.

Other participating artists were Group de Recherche d'Art Visuel (GRAV), Group N from Northern Italy, Zero group from Düsseldorf, and other individuals from Germany (Gerhard von Graevenitz, Uli Pohl and others from the Geitlinger class), Marc Adrian from Austria, and Paul Talman and Karl Gerstner from Switzerland (see illustration 4, Exhibition view NT1).

Since 1957 increasingly dense networking between those groups and individuals had been formed, which also included Spanish group Equipo 57 and Italian T group, and as supportive elder figures Yves Klein, Jesús Rafael Soto, Victor Vasarely and Lucio Fontana. The first Zagreb exhibition brought home the point that this collection of artist resembled a new movement.

Despite big differences among the participants, there were also a lot of common ground. The orientation of those groups and individuals was in many cases collectivist and anti-art. The market was seen as distorting the function of art. In their view, art was not hanging in galleries, it was supposed to be part and parcel of the human life-world, realized in everyday objects and the environment. Between this first and second exhibition in Zagreb in 1963, New Tendencies became a veritable movement and network with a shared, but not unified, agenda. Those collectives of mostly young men and a few women abandoned the term art for visual research.
French painter Francois Morellet expected “a revolution in art, similar to that in science.” Some of those groups such as GRAV and N combined collective work with a rational, constructivist orientation, and leftist ideas. There were also those groups who primarily saw their new aesthetics as experiments, to create new sensations, such as Zero, who thought that by creating new aesthetic experiences they were liberating their audiences from social norms.

The Italian critic Giulio Carlo Argan became one of the most prominent supporters. He argued that artistic research helped to realize homo ludens (man the player) inside homo faber (man the maker). Argan's term Gestalt ricerca (Italian, Gestalt research) became the name of a new movement in Italy. Gestalt psychology had strong roots in Italy because of the existence of a native branch of Gestalt psychology in Padua. In this illustration (Nr 5), we see members of Group N on the rooftop of their studio in Padua, holding a work, Dynamic Vision, which is a good example of the application of Gestalt phenomena. Plastic tape is mounted in front of a painted background in such a way that rapid foreground-background relation changes appear.

The artists creatively applied principles from Gestalt psychology. Those optical illusions create a visual vibration or a dazzle, a sensation which is real and intersubjective, yet can only be explained by perceptual processes, because what is seen is not actually there, it only exists in the perceiving eye and mind. New Tendencies artists sought a dynamic relationship between work and viewer which resulted in an optical instability, a vibration on the margins of the visual field, a dazzle (see illustration Nr 6 large version of Dynamic Vision).

I suggest to understand the aesthetics of New Tendencies in the context of unorthodox postwar neo-Marxism, represented in the West by figures such as Henry Lefebvre, Ernst Bloch, Herbert Marcuse. In Zagreb and Belgrade, philosophers edited Praxis magazine, which published articles by those international starts of the new left, as well as by homegrown philosophers. Praxis also organised the famous Korcula Summer School from 1964 to 1974. Praxis was, although not directly linked with New Tendencies, like a theoretical counterpoint or equivalent to it. Praxis' core topic was self-management, the official ideology of Yugoslavia.

“Autogestion” (French for self-management) became the battle cry of the 1968 generation. The Yugoslav third way attracted the interest of leftists from all over the world. After Yugoslavia had become founding member of the nonaligned movement of nations, it tried to find a third way also intellectually and artistically between the capitalist West and the Soviet dominated Eastern bloc. Yugoslavia did not impose any restrictions on art and allowed its own citizens to travel abroad and granted Visa free entry to citizens from East and West.

I propose to understand the “relational aesthetics” of New Tendencies in this context of a quest for self-management and self-governement as part of a “project”. In Ernst Bloch's philosophy of the project, which was in turn derived from Marx and Hegel, history was understood as negation of reality as it existed and the result of creating an outline for self-development in front of an open historical horizon. The participatory artwork can be read as the physical manifestation of the Hegelian process of mediation between subject and object, between the particular and the universal. The dazzle is the moment of reversal, the turning point (German “Umschlagpunkt”) of Hegelian dialectics, when a thesis, through its negation, turns into synthesis.

The moving artwork or the work that demands movement leads to a sudden visual sensation, the dazzle. This sensation can be understood in analogy to the expected revolutionary, qualitative jump arising from the actual realization of the political ideal of self-management. Hegelian, Marxist views of history emphasize the sudden jump: a long and slow build-up, the tendency, leads to a sudden explosion, the qualitative shift.ii The relationship between work and viewer in the visual field created by the artworks is equivalent with the abstract logical form of the Hegelian close of argument. The kinetic art work realizes such a qualitative shift, as if under laboratory conditions, in art. This projective, ideal moment was arrived at with the viewer experiencing the dazzle – when a Gestalt effect physically worked in the mind of a viewer.

According to co-founder and chief theorist of New Tendencies Matko Meštrović,iii the historical tendency was one of the total humanization of the life-world. The project of New Tendencies was to link this with the humanization of the sciences through art. The modernistic expectation to go pregnant with the future at any moment becomes realized in the artwork that materializes such a leap inside its own structure. The content of each work is nothing else but a demonstration, in the abstract, of Hegelian turning points, each one marking a point in history when new horizons open, when the dialectics of master and slave, capital and producer, order giver and order receiver experience qualitative changes; when the objects of history turn themselves into subjects.

New Tendencies were most productive between the first and the second exhibition in 1961 and 1963 respectively. The movement became nearly dominant in Europa by the mid 1960s. The scale of works also shifted from small objects to environments. Sometimes the whole range of dynamic, visually interactive experience was deployed together in large scale cooperative artworks, such as the Labyrinth created by GRAV. After a first version created for the Biennale of Young Artists of Paris in 1963, another Labyrinth was produced on the occasion of the New Tendencies exhibition at the Louvre in Paris in 1964 (see illustration 7). The Labyrinths were signed collectively; those works amounted to strong visual shock tactics, consisting of stroboscopic lights, virtual movement (the phi effect), mirrors and other devices on a grand scale.

Many artists involved in New Tendencies participated in The Responsive Eye at MoMA in 1965, but sudden fame was corrosive for the movement and some of the groups involved. A crisis was experienced and reflected at the symposium in Brezovica in 1965 (see illustration 8). After a break from the biannual rhythm, New Tendencies returned in 1968/69 under the banner of “the computer as a medium of visual research.” The Stuttgart Circle of Max Bense, and the information aesthetics of Bense and Abraham Moles provided the theoretic background for work such as Frieder Nake's and Hiroshi Kawano's (see illustrations 9 and 10).

In a string of events, from summer 1968 to 69, and then again in 1971 and 1973, New Tendencies showed visual research realized by computer, but also still constructive art. The Zagreb exhibition of 1973 presented constructive, computer and conceptual art side by side. That time saw conceptual art and related new types of practices gradually gaining in importance. Artists from the autonomous region of Vojvodina, like Bosch + Bosch group and Bálint Szombathy carried out work such as Szombathy's famous Lenin in Budapest, which challenged the conventions of image making in a socialist state (see illustration 11). The 1973 exhibition was seen as a failure by contemporaries, but in retrospect becomes recognized as an important moment in 20th century art, to be put into a sequence with Cybernetic Serendipity (1968), Software (1970) and Information (1970), as well as When Attitudes become Form (1969).
The curators in Zagreb also published a magazine, Bit International, from 1968 to 1972, which reflected not only on computer art and information aesthetics, but also on design and on electronic media (see illustration 12). New Tendencies created art of an advanced neo-avant-garde position on the cusp of the transition from industrial society to the information era.

Around the late 1960s, Keynesian Fordism started to experience its own crisis, and modernization projects fell apart for different reasons. Yugoslavia, after enjoying high economic growth rates of up to 11%, suddenly entered a start and sputter pattern. After 1968, in which Yugoslav students had participated lively, the regime turned increasingly repressive and shut down Praxis in 1974, while New Tendencies was left to peter out. In Latin America, hegemonic influence, such as the USA-supported military coups in Brazil and Chile, brought about a change in governance, which abandoned the modernistic emancipatory project and initiated what would become known as “neoliberal experiment” and “lost decades”.

Conclusions

The “third space” created by this movement in non-aligned Yugoslavia enabled an art movement that took the modernistic paradigm and developed it into something that pointed beyond it. The peripheral status of the country of origin of many participants enabled them to embrace modernity more radically and produce a project where bottom-up forms of social self-organization were rehearsed in a participatory, 'social' art. Yet for exactly the same reasons – the peripheral status of the critics and institutions supporting it, and the precarious character of the modernization projects – this movement lost its support structures after 1968 and went almost forgotten in the 1980s. I would like to end with questions rather than strong conclusions: What can we learn form the demise of such a movement, that centered on a project? Is there anything to be recovered as an unrealized but desirable potential? Or can we also learn from the failure, from the impossibility of its unrecognized, sometimes contradictory assumptions?

by Armin Medosch

May 19, 2016

Mobile Communications for All

Connectivity for the unconnected: a double bind

During the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona this past February, Facebook made an “historic” announcement that they were launching the Telecom Infra Project (TIP) in conjunction with a number of large telecommunications companies and manufacturers. The new initiative takes a page from another Facebook-led industry collaboration called the Open Compute Project [http://www.opencompute.org] and is all about vastly lowering the costs for telecommunications carriers to build new networks by creating inexpensive, open-source software and hardware. This level of collaboration between Facebook and major telecoms companies is unprecedented and signals a shift from what has traditionally been an adversarial relationship, at least publicly.

So what is this about? Why the collaboration all of a sudden? The answer is fairly simple. This initiative is about getting more people on-line by making it less expensive for traditional providers to build out their networks into places without coverage. Something like 6 out of every 10 people with access to the Internet use Facebook. So the company must focus not only on trying to turn 6 into 7 (growth in existing markets), but also on expanding the total number of people on-line (creation of new markets). An anecdote that I find useful here is to imagine a publishing house so successful that its main obstacle to selling more books is illiteracy. TIP is about Facebook finding ways to teach people to read. Companies like Google and Facebook simply need to get more people on-line and they automatically make money. This is why they are underwriting network rollouts and innovation, through project Link from Google and the TIP project that FB is coordinating. For the major telecoms companies the benefit of a project like TIP is that its stated aim is to make it easier and less expensive to set up new networks.

These two initiatives, Link and TIP are more grounded (literally) elements of both companies’ access and connectivity portfolios that are otherwise fairly cynical attempts to connect people to the Internet without actually involving them in the process. Think lasers, balloons, drones and so on. There has also been a quite a kerfuffle internationally about the Free Basics platform that Facebook has been fitfully rolling out, and prior to that around net-neutrality. Internet access for those who don’t have it “yet” and how to go about it is an issue with many facets and competing interests.

Talking to people who move bits from one place to another in Mexico (small ISPs, mainly), they claim that around 80% of the traffic their networks transport is related to Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. This is troubling in that, even with open standards and net neutrality in place, the web has been conquered to such a major extent by large companies. Perhaps, in some round-about way, it does make sense for these big companies to underwrite the construction of new networks. Yet the proposition is a scary one. Imagine the control these companies have and continue to amass when they not only control the content platforms but the physical infrastructure over which data is transported as well.

When we talk about access or connectivity, about getting more people on-line, what are we really talking about and what can we expect? As time goes on, the “Internet” has become more and more about serving content to users than about peer-to-peer sharing, as in the salad days of the early, more peer-to-peer internet. As some have argued, the internet is increasingly becoming like TV – a tool of mass media – yet more insidious. Early theorists about the development possibilities of mass media are not wrong in saying that TV or radio is useful for this purpose. But as those media have shown, and the internet as a new form of networked media is showing, much of what mass media delivers is mediocre at best and perhaps even culturally damaging. The negative impact of these media is more palpably disruptive to people from non-western cultures, who very rarely get a hand in creating or distributing their own content in their own languages. In many cases, especially in countries where technology is imposed as part of foreign aid or wholesale reform packages, information and communication technologies act as vehicles for the rationalization of society through the introduction and bolstering of market logic. In this sense, the mere existence of mass media and networks lays the cultural and economic groundwork for their own perpetuation.

So while access to information is a good thing, what is the baggage connectivity brings along with it? Probably the most harmful is the opening up of marginalized and generally “non-essential”, peripheral people and places to data mining and surveillance. The economic value of reaching new populations is difficult to quantify but certainly substantial. Economics aside, though, there is an undeniable geopolitical value for those in power in aggregating and analyzing behavioral data in the poorer parts of the globe where unrest is most common and likely.

In a broader context, telecommunications services are treated as a good or service, and so ensuring these goods are offered in the market is of utmost importance as this generates revenue directly for the companies that provide the services to customers. Secondarily, as these services or goods exist within a market-based global system it is also worth considering their usefulness in facilitating international commerce. In fact, one might argue convincingly that our current world market could not exist in any recognizable form without digital communications infrastructure. In this sense, telecommunications have become – and perhaps always were – a strategic sector with regards to the furtherance and reproduction of global capitalism. And so the “system”, as it were, ensures that these networks exist and reach where necessary.

There is a strong argument to make that a third way in which telecoms underpin global capitalism is through the facilitation and expansion of state surveillance and corporate data-mining. Over the past couple decades we have witnessed the construction of an unprecedented surveillance apparatus that threatens the fundamental rights of all people, and that creates an environment of panoptic repression and control. This is good for those in power who want to stay there as well as for gathering consumer information and feeding increasingly “intelligent” corporate algorithms.

With respect to expanding communications in rural areas, there has historically been a tension in that it is not economically viable to provide telecommunications services with an eye towards profit in many places on earth and yet, as argued above, for reasons of national security and the growth of capitalism, it is necessary to incorporate ever larger areas and populations. The special treatment of telecommunications is evidenced by the nearly endless litany of studies and news items proclaiming that there are more people with mobile phones than access to clean drinking water or sanitation facilities, and that network infrastructure is already more pervasive than basic infrastructure (electricity, roads, housing, etc) in many places. Something seems off, when those on the margins can’t find a job or shit in a flush-toilet, but can access Facebook from their cell phone. The point here is not to moralize, but to understand why this is happening.

Traditionally, big telco companies pass the baton to governments in places where there is no direct profit motive and the latter steps in with digital inclusion strategies (many of which fail) and universal service funds (which are also abject failures). To wit, the US State Department started something called Global Connect to bring an additional 1.5 billion people online in developing countries. In Mexico, there is an office called the Coordination of the Information and Knowledge Society, who’s stated goal is: “Driving effectively the country’s transition to the Information and Knowledge Society, integrating the efforts of various public and private actors in this task, and drawing on all Mexicans to join this process”.

Essentially this is an example of how the State is responsible for ensuring the conditions for the expansion and deepening of the logic and economic model of neoliberal capitalism, which, if history is any indication, is not necessarily something people in rural areas want or will find beneficial. And now the aforementioned baton is being passed back to corporations, albeit of a different ilk as big internet companies like Google and Facebook are proclaiming their interest in dealing with the problem of rural connectivity, and are enlisting the help of large telcos. This troika of Big Internet, Big Telco and the State might just get internet to everyone on earth, but at what cost and in whose name? Unless we radically re-imagine networks: how they are built, managed and how people engage with them, there seems to be no way that pursuing increased connectivity doesn’t also do a whole lot of harm both directly and indirectly to the people it is meant to help.


by ammoch

May 18, 2016

Decentralized Citizen Engagement Technologies

Meet the organizers

The Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city event is the biggest European event on network democracy, new forms of citizen participation, digital tools for democratic participation and urban commons for democratic cities. Organised on the 23–28 May, we expect 400+ academics, activists, politicians and hackers to attend in Madrid, Spain.

The event activities, spread to 6 days, are organised by a group of organisations working with direct democracy, citizen participation, and bottom-up initiatives.

D-CENT (Decentralized Citizens ENgagement Technologies) is the largest European project on direct democracy. It has created open, secure and privacy-aware tools for direct democracy and economic empowerment. D-CENT has run from October 2013 to May 2016, and it is co-funded by the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and innovation. It comprises a strong international consortium with nine partners from across Europe. The Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city is the final event of the D-CENT project, showcasing and celebrating its results especially in the International conference organised on the 27-28 of May.

NESTA (UK, London) is an independent charity that works to increase the innovation capacity of the UK. The organisation acts through a combination of practical programmes, investment, policy and research, and the formation of partnerships to promote innovation across a broad range of sectors. Nesta is the coordinator of the D-CENT project.

MEDIA-LAB PRADO is a citizen laboratory of production, research and broadcasting of cultural projects that explores the forms of experimentation and collaborative learning that have emerged from digital networks. It is part of the Department of Culture and Sports (former Department of Arts, Sports and Tourism) of the Madrid City Council. Medialab-Prado aims to operate as an open platform that invites and allows users to configure, alter and modify research and production processes. It is the key organization behind the Democracy Lab, organized on the 23-27 May as part of the event Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city.

MUSEO REINA SOFIA (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia) is Spain’s national museum of 20th-century art. Offering a mixture of national and international temporary exhibitions in its many galleries it is one of the world’s largest museums for modern and contemporary art. Museo Reina Sofia is the event venue of the International Conference organized on the 27-28 May as part of the Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city event.

In the last yearMADRID CITY COUNCIL has made a firm commitment to direct democracy, participation and transparency. Through the website Decide Madrid, citizen proposals are collected as well as direct interviews and discussion forums facilitated. The City Council has also launched the most ambitious participatory budget in Europe, through which citizens decide the use of 60 million euros. The objective of the City is to move forward and spread direct democracy beyond the city limits: as such, the free software developed for these participatory processes is available to any institution and administration worldwide.

BARCELONA CITY COUNCIL is committed to participatory, transparent and open democracy involving all social groups and citizens. Among the most recent projects is the participatory development of the Municipal Action Plan and the District Action Plans, for which there have been more than 400 physical meetings and contact with more than 30,000 individuals and associations. This engagement has resulted in more than 10,000 proposals being submitted through Decidim Barcelona. Further evidence of the commitment to participation can be seen through the collaborative production of public policies; community management of resources and municipal facilities; and the commitment to transparency and direct interaction by adopting a mix of new technologies and traditional communication with its citizens. The goal is to build a radically democratic city based on direct participation, open governance, urban commons and collective intelligence.

by admin

Vlax

the corporate marketing team appreciates your free labour on their ...

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May 17, 2016

Decentralized Citizen Engagement Technologies

Madrid digital participation experiences

Decide Madrid is an open consultation and direct democracy platform launched by the city of Madrid after the recent municipal elections. It enables citizens to propose, debate, prioritise and implement policy for the city.

Decide Madrid is built on software called Consul. Consul is an open source and free software Internet application. That means any other government or organization can easily replicate it. Consul was released on September 2015 in Madrid as Decide Madrid.

Madrid City has made an effort to help other cities to use this new open source technology developed in Madrid. It was replicated in the Oviedo City on December as consultaOviedo.es, and in January in Barcelona as decidim.barcelona. More than 20 cities in Spain are planning to implement it in the following months.

Consul has been inspired by LaboDemo experience in Plaza Podemos. Plaza Podemos is an Internet forum for Podemos party where everyone can debate. Once a proposal gets enough support, it jumps to a binding mechanism where finally there is a general consultation.

Boosting bottom-up participation 

Decide Madrid has been conceived as a bottom-up proposal mechanism where everyone can propose and debate but just people living in Madrid can have a binding support and vote. A deliberative forum is integrated with the citizen proposals mechanism. Until now, more than 15.000 proposals with more than 74.000 comments and 1.688.000 supports have been made. There are between 100.000 and 200.000 different users visits each month and more than 1.300.000 visits in total.

Once a proposal reaches the 2% threshold, a binding consultation will be promoted, and everyone (Madrid residents) will decide if this proposal can turn into action.

First plugin has been released on February and it allows the first participatory budgeting in Madrid: giving 60 millions Euros to be realized by bottom-up citizen proposals. More than 5.000 proposals have been made, some of them from individuals and others coming from collaborative face-to-face meetings in every district. The process to decide which proposals become a reality will be similar to Better Reykjavik in Iceland: people have to fill a budget line adding proposals until they reach the total quantity.

Better Reykjavik is a platform that has been running in the Reykjavik City for six years, and it has enabled hundreds of proposals to become a reality. Since its launch, the website has inspired more than 70,000 people to propose and discuss over 4,200 ideas. Better Reykjavik is created by Citizen Foundation in Iceland, and it is one of three pilots of the D-CENT project.


Join us in Madrid!

On the  23–28 May, D-CENT and collaboration partners are organising the biggest European event on network democracy, new forms of citizen participation, digital tools for democratic participation and urban commons for democratic cities.  The Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city event takes place in Madrid, Spain. Welcome!

>> Read more

by admin

May 12, 2016

Decentralized Citizen Engagement Technologies

Meet our speakers in Madrid 23-28 May

Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city taking place from the 23–28 May in Madrid, will gather together +400 participants to discuss network democracy, new forms of citizen participation, digital tools for democratic participation, and urban commons for democratic cities. The International Conference (27-28 May, Museo Reina Sofia) will conclude the week’s activities, and is the final event of the D-CENT project. The conference is a unique chance to hear a wide range of thought leaders, policy-makers, urban planners, philosophers, activists and academics to discuss the future of citizen led movements and democratic technology. Evgeny Morozov is one of the speakers. Morozov will be joining a panel session on the 27th of May, to discuss post-capitalism, digital commons and democratic cities. #DCENTMadrid #DemocraticCity

There is one common denominator that binds the conference speakers, namely that they are in many ways activists and pioneers that have revolutionized democracy in the past years, and are rethinking technology and shaping public policy to devolve power to the people.

In a snapshot some of our distinguished speakers

Julian Assange
Julian Assange is an Australian publisher, journalist, and activist. He is the editor-in-chief of WikiLeaks, which he co-founded in 2006 after an earlier career in hacking and programming. He is the author of Cypherpunks (OR Books, 2011) and When Google met Wikileaks (OR Books, 2014). His latest book is The Wikileaks Files (Verso Books, 2015).

Raquel Rolnik
Raquel Rolnik is an architect and urban planner and professor at the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism of the USP. She was special rapporteur of the UN Human Rights Council on the Right to Adequate Housing, for two terms (2008-2011, 2011-2014).

Paul Mason
Paul Mason is a freelance journalist and film-maker. His documentary #ThisIsACoup told the story of Syriza’s clash with the Eurozone and IMF in 2015. His latest book is Postcapitalism: A Guide to Our Future. He is a participant in the New Economics project organised by Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party.

Evgeny Morozov
Evgeny Morozov is the author of To Save Everything, Click Here (2013), The Net Delusion (2011) and a columnist for a number of international publications. He’s written extensively about technology and politics for publications such as The New Yorker, London Review of Books, Financial Times, and others.

Francesca Bria
Francesca Bria has a PhD on innovation economics from Imperial College, London and is a Senior Advisor on technology and innovation policy at Nesta Innovation Lab. She is the EU Coordinator of the D-CENT project on open democracy and digital currencies and the DSI project on digital social innovation in Europe. She is an adviser for the European Commission on the internet of things, smart cities, and innovation policy.

Francesco “Bifo” Berardi
Francesco Berardi is a contemporary writer, media-theorist and media-activist. He founded the magazine A/traverso (1975-1981) and was part of the staff of Radio Alice, the first free pirate radio station in Italy (1976-1978).

Sergio Amadeu de Silveira
Sergio Amadeu da Silveira is a Professor at Federal University of ABC (UFABC). He received his PhD in Political Science from University of São Paulo (USP) in 2005. He is a known researcher of digital networks, privacy and collaborative technologies. He is free software activist.

Pablo Soto
Pablo Soto is a Councillor for Citizen Participation, Transparency and Open Government in the City of Madrid. He is a member of the Governing Board and the Councillor for Citizen Participation, Transparency and Open Government.

Adam Greenfield
Adam Greenfield is a London-based writer and urbanist. Senior Urban Fellow at LSE Cities for 2014, he currently teaches the “Architectures of Participation” course at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. Greenfield’s publications include Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing (2006), Against the smart city (2013), and Radical Technologies (forthcoming from Verso).

>> All speakers

REGISTER NOW!

http://democratic-cities.cc

Follow us on #DCENTMadrid #DemocraticCities


Meet our speakers: Evgeny Morozov, author and editorialist

Evgeny Morozov is the author of To Save Everything, Click Here (2013), The Net Delusion (2011) and a columnist for a number of international publications. He’s written extensively about technology and politics for publications such as The New Yorker, London Review of Books, Financial Times, and others.

Snapshot of the programme:

Friday 27 May 2016
at 12:30 Post-capitalism, digital commons and democratic cities

Chair: Francesca Bria, Technology and innovation policy advisor, D-CENT Project Coordinator, Nesta

Paul Mason, Journalist, The Guardian
Trebor Scholz, Activist-scholar, The New School
Francesco Berardi, Writer and philosopher
Evgeny Morozov, Author and editorialist

>> See full schedule

Event website: http://democratic-cities.cc

Read Morozov’s interview to learn why he thinks it is important to go beyond the concept of the Internet in order to understand what Identity means in the current digital world. And how he sees the role of D-CENT and digital technologies in promoting digital participation, solidarity and collaboration?

D-CENT interview: Evgeny Morozov from D-CENT on Vimeo.

by admin

Pineapple Donut

Pirates, politics and art.

The world is a strange place. Unsure of what to do about my political frustration, I decided to nominate as a Senate candidate for the Pirate Party Australia in the up coming Australian federal election. I discovered late on Sunday night that I had been elected by the members as the lead candidate.

Coincidentally, last night (Monday) my partner got us tickets to see the Australian Art Orchestra with Nicole Lizée present Hymns to Pareidolia. Knowing nothing before we went in, it turned out to be an almost perfect live music experience for me. And while I was watching and listening, I realized that for some reason I hadn’t been open about my taste in big A Art to the pirates.

So I’ve decided to make a short list of artists that I appreciate for your delectation.

The very first artists this concert made me think of was a band I’ve never had the pleasure of seeing live and most likely never will, even in it’s reduced state – Negativland, a band I first discovered via their album Dispepsi, although were already semi folk heroes because of what I’d heard about their U2 EP which, thanks to the then newly discovered web, I’d downloaded via Napster or Gnutella. Then their EP with Chumbawamba became my jam for a couple of years – The ABCs of Anarchism.

It’s hard to know what came next, but suddenly I was listening to difficult music. The audio equivalent of The Illuminatus! Trilogy – some of it very very listenable, like 2manyDJs Radio Soulwax pt 2, some of it was understandable pop if hard for others to appreciate, like Cassette Boy (some songs available), and some was painful to others, like Buttress O’Kneel, John Oswald‘s Plunderphonics or The Evolution Control Committee. Their Rebel Without a Pause is considered one of, if not the, first mashups. And then there is DJ Food’s Raiding the 20th Century, an unparalleled exploration, history lesson, exposition, on the nature of music and remix – itself a remix of over 190 mash up tracks.

Thankfully, this new remix culture quickly became rampant – the tools were readily available to anyone with a computer, and the mash up was not only born but breaking out. Thankfully, while some went for the decidedly pop route (Girl Talk, Freelance Hellraiser’s A Stroke of Genius), some remained dedicated to the plain strange. It was around this time that DJ Danger Mouse’s The Grey Album – mixing The Beatle’s White Album with Jay-Z’s Black Album – became an unofficial hit.

The intrinsic sharing nature of the internet allowed a genre of music called outsider to spread more widely. Associated with the avant garde, mail art, surrealist and underground movements, most notable for it’s intense passion for the artform regardless of actual ability was refreshing for me. The Shaggs are the best example to my mind, and have one of the best back stories to boot, and we see this movement reborn as the Antifolk movement of the late 90s, but also side swiped by other pop weirdos – Singing Sadie (Everyone in town wants you dead), Toxic Lipstick (Slut cunt hairbrush), the unstoppable and ever loved New Waver from Spill records (check out Spill compilation 3), San Jose Cow Muzak’s Mrs Bronson’s favourite remains a….favourite. Also, anything on Dual Plover, including it’s peak moment, The Rebirth of Fool, vol 2.

And there were aficionados and curators that made things easier for us – I would religiously download (by hand! pre-podcast!) and listen to Some Assembly Required, or ABC Radio National’s The Night Air, and the revelation that was the first time I discovered WFMU‘s the 365 Days Project in 2004 (now UbuWeb‘s first 365 Days Project) and downloaded all of the songs over a week…so many of these songs have become better known now, but at the time, they were a revelation. It wasn’t piracy – this was the only place they were documented on the internet. It was curation. My go to piece from this period is the Van Morrison “contractual obligation record” – Ring Worm/You Say France And I Whistle/Want A Danish – although the project is literally littered with passionate brilliance. Louis Farrakhan singing calypso? The Frugal Gormets – Satan’s Blood (“Some kids try really hard to sound evil, these kids succeeded.”)? Bach vs Batman on the moog? Understanding Marx?

These days there are blogs that curate such weirdnesses abound, my favourite being Music for Maniacs, a haven of some of the strangest pop music available. Including  classics like Party Like It’s Only $19.99, the Prince tribute done by The Evolution Control Committee; OUTER SPACE MUSIC FROM OUTER SPACE!; two Sesame St Disco albums; a string of Xmas albums that aren’t really ever appropriate; maybe Halloween is more your thing?; American Standard by Thelonious Moog;  don’t like standards or Moog? What about some experimental bagpipe music?; or maybe your taste are more along the lines of the three album, 62 track compilations of Xanadu covers (More Xanadu)?

I’m going to close with the two stand outs. Vicki Bennett, performing as People Like Us, has been a consistent source of fantastic mind bending music and inspiration. Her Do or DIY with People Like Us radio show on WFMU is a stand out that I can’t recommend highly enough. You’ll never hear Percy Faith’s Summer Place ’76 (Theme From A Summer Place) in the same way again. This show has bought me many, many pleasures, but the top of the list has to be Caroline Bergvall’s Via (48 Dante translations) (mp3).

But sitting on top of all of this is the Australian art duo Soda Jerk‘s Pixel Pirate II: Attack of the Astro Elvis Video Clone. (aka Hollywood Burn). Taking all of these ideas, and doing it coherently, with film. It remains my favourite movie of all time, and I am still in debt to Jean Poole for introducing me to it. From the blurb:

Hollywood Burn is an anti-copyright epic constructed entirely from hundreds of samples pirated from the Hollywood archive. It pits a righteous league of video pirates against the evil tyrant Moses and his Copyright Commandments. Determined to alter the present by changing the past, the pirates travel back to 1955 to construct the ultimate weapon: an Elvis Presley video-clone.

Part sci-fi + rom com + biblical epic + action movie, this remix manifesto adopts the tactical responses of the parasite, feeding off the body of Hollywood and inhabiting its cinematic codes. The unwitting all-star cast includes Elvis Presley, Charlton Heston, Jack Sparrow, Monkey Magic, Bette Davis, Batman, Jaws, Jesus, the Hulk, the Hoff and the Ghostbusters.

What can I say? It’s essential viewing for members of the Pirate Party.

by datakid23

Decentralized Citizen Engagement Technologies

Meet our speakers in Madrid 23-28 May

Democratic Cities – Commons technology and the right to a democratic city taking place from the 23–28 May in Madrid, will gather together +400 participants to discuss network democracy, new forms of citizen participation, digital tools for democratic participation, and urban commons for democratic cities. The International Conference (27-28 May, Museo Reina Sofia) will conclude the week’s activities, and is the final event of the D-CENT project. The conference is a unique chance to hear a wide range of thought leaders, policy-makers, urban planners, philosophers, activists and academics to discuss the future of citizen led movements and democratic technology. Evgeny Morozov is one of the speakers. Morozov will be joining a panel session on the 27th of May, to discuss post-capitalism, digital commons and democratic cities. #DCENTMadrid #DemocraticCity

There is one common denominator that binds the conference speakers, namely that they are in many ways activists and pioneers that have revolutionized democracy in the past years, and are rethinking technology and shaping public policy to devolve power to the people.

In a snapshot some of our distinguished speakers

Julian Assange
Julian Assange is an Australian publisher, journalist, and activist. He is the editor-in-chief of WikiLeaks, which he co-founded in 2006 after an earlier career in hacking and programming. He is the author of Cypherpunks (OR Books, 2011) and When Google met Wikileaks (OR Books, 2014). His latest book is The Wikileaks Files (Verso Books, 2015).

Raquel Rolnik
Raquel Rolnik is an architect and urban planner and professor at the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism of the USP. She was special rapporteur of the UN Human Rights Council on the Right to Adequate Housing, for two terms (2008-2011, 2011-2014).

Paul Mason
Paul Mason is a freelance journalist and film-maker. His documentary #ThisIsACoup told the story of Syriza’s clash with the Eurozone and IMF in 2015. His latest book is Postcapitalism: A Guide to Our Future. He is a participant in the New Economics project organised by Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party.

Evgeny Morozov
Evgeny Morozov is the author of To Save Everything, Click Here (2013), The Net Delusion (2011) and a columnist for a number of international publications. He’s written extensively about technology and politics for publications such as The New Yorker, London Review of Books, Financial Times, and others.

Francesca Bria
Francesca Bria has a PhD on innovation economics from Imperial College, London and is a Senior Advisor on technology and innovation policy at Nesta Innovation Lab. She is the EU Coordinator of the D-CENT project on open democracy and digital currencies and the DSI project on digital social innovation in Europe. She is an adviser for the European Commission on the internet of things, smart cities, and innovation policy.

Francesco “Bifo” Berardi
Francesco Berardi is a contemporary writer, media-theorist and media-activist. He founded the magazine A/traverso (1975-1981) and was part of the staff of Radio Alice, the first free pirate radio station in Italy (1976-1978).

Sergio Amadeu de Silveira
Sergio Amadeu da Silveira is a Professor at Federal University of ABC (UFABC). He received his PhD in Political Science from University of São Paulo (USP) in 2005. He is a known researcher of digital networks, privacy and collaborative technologies. He is free software activist.

Pablo Soto
Pablo Soto is a Councillor for Citizen Participation, Transparency and Open Government in the City of Madrid. He is a member of the Governing Board and the Councillor for Citizen Participation, Transparency and Open Government.

Adam Greenfield
Adam Greenfield is a London-based writer and urbanist. Senior Urban Fellow at LSE Cities for 2014, he currently teaches the “Architectures of Participation” course at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. Greenfield’s publications include Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing (2006), Against the smart city (2013), and Radical Technologies (forthcoming from Verso).

>> All speakers

REGISTER NOW!

http://democratic-cities.cc

Follow us on #DCENTMadrid #DemocraticCities


Meet our speakers: Evgeny Morozov, author and editorialist

Evgeny Morozov is the author of To Save Everything, Click Here (2013), The Net Delusion (2011) and a columnist for a number of international publications. He’s written extensively about technology and politics for publications such as The New Yorker, London Review of Books, Financial Times, and others.

Snapshot of the programme:

Friday 27 May 2016
at 12:30 Post-capitalism, digital commons and democratic cities

Chair: Francesca Bria, Technology and innovation policy advisor, D-CENT Project Coordinator, Nesta

Paul Mason, Journalist, The Guardian
Trebor Scholz, Activist-scholar, The New School
Francesco Berardi, Writer and philosopher
Evgeny Morozov, Author and editorialist

>> See full schedule

Event website: http://democratic-cities.cc

Read Morozov’s interview to learn why he thinks it is important to go beyond the concept of the Internet in order to understand what Identity means in the current digital world. And how he sees the role of D-CENT and digital technologies in promoting digital participation, solidarity and collaboration?

D-CENT interview: Evgeny Morozov from D-CENT on Vimeo.

by admin

May 11, 2016

Informatic school is in southwest Cameroon

Matthias Baumgartner Course Instructor for Linux Commands 2016

 

On the  03/05/2016 Matthias  Baumgartner from Switzerland arrive Cameroon for an intensive

course on Linux Command,  the members of the Associaiton of Linux Friends are the beneficiaries. The  aimed of this course is to trained Linux Friends Members as Administrators.

photo 1

Day one Mathias Baumgartner gives lectures on the Linux operating systems, file tree.

photo 4

 

photo 2(1)

Day two

-File tree

-Relative and Absolute path

-Directories and files

-putting commands together

photo 1(1)

 

Day three

-how to fine out disk space

-how to fine out file sizes

-how to fine out folder sizes

-how to use less

-how to use cat

-how to use the man page

Day  Four

-processe and program

-Revision and group work

-Day Five

Exams on the above topics

For the First week, 18 students started the Course and at the end of the Week 14 students wrote the exams

by admin

May 10, 2016

Vlax

Init Freedom Campaign

Init Freedom Campaign

  • restoring a sane approach to PID1, one that respects diversity and freedom of choice.

    • systemd supporters wrongly claim that “systemd is overwhelmingly better than any existing alternative anywhere the technical architecture is involved.”

-> Devuan GNU+Linux Free/Libre Operating System

#devuan #debian #systemd #system #GNU #information #softwarelibre #dyne

https://devuan.org/os/init-freedom

Dowse 0.9

… – Changes: The internal messaging system is now relying on Redis as a core component for Dowse. Kore is adopted as web interface, Pendulum is added as a process to monitor the presence of things on LAN, Netdata is adopted as status graph dashboard. Events can be exported to OSC. Developers documentation is com

by jaromil

In the news

¿Cuál es la verdadera cara del bitcóin? - RT en Español - Noticias internacionales


RT en Español - Noticias internacionales

¿Cuál es la verdadera cara del bitcóin?
RT en Español - Noticias internacionales
Sin embargo, según el invitado Jaromil, de Dyne.org, Wright no es en realidad Nakamoto. "Coincido con muchos analistas que aseguran que las pruebas que ha aportado no demuestran su afirmación. En su página web, en la que cuenta con el apoyo de ...

and more »

Error loading player: Could not load player configuration - RT


RT

Error loading player: Could not load player configuration
RT
In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max and Stacy discuss Goldman Sachs managing to deplete the Teamsters' pension fund more successfully and rapidly than the mob could ever manage to. As this and other pension funds face depletion, however, some ...

May 06, 2016

The Next Layer

Vortrag: New Tendencies und Kinetika 1967

Vortrag gehalten am 26.04. 2016 anlässlich der Eröffnung der Ausstellung Rückblick Kinetika 1967 im 21er Haus. An der Ausstellung Kinetika, gezeigt im damaligen 20er Haus, nahmen viele Künstlerinnen und Künstler Teil, die in der Künstlerbewegung und Netzwerk New Tendencies eine wichtige Rolle spielten. Dieser Vortrag fasst einige Grundzüge der New Tendencies zusammen und nimmt Bezug auf den höchst interessanten Kinetika 1967 Katalogtext von Otto Antonia Graf.

Die Neue Tendenzen nahmen ihren Ausgangspunkt 1961 in Zagreb, der Hauptstadt von Kroatien, das damals eine der Teilrepubliken der Föderation der sozialistischen Republiken Jugoslawiens war. Eine erste Ausstellung in Zagreb im Jahr 1961 gab dieser sehr internationalen Bewegung ihren Namen, die auch als Nove Tendencije, Nouvelle Tendance oder New Tendencies bekannt sind. Initiiert wurde diese erste Ausstellung vom brasilianischen Künstler Almir Mavignier und dem kroatischen Kunsthistoriker und Kritiker Matko Mestrovic. Das ist insofern interessant also wir es hier mit einem dezentralem Modernismus zu tun haben, einer außerhalb der damaligen Zentren, Paris und New York entstandenen Neo-Avantgarde. Im Einklang mit führenden ex-jugoslawischen Kunsthistorikern und Theoretikern wie Misko Suvakovic und Ales Erjavec möchte ich festhalten, dass es sich um eine dezidiert neo-avantgardistische Strömung handelte, ein Modernismus also, der also nicht bloß abgeleitet war aus den Errungenschaften der historischen Avantgarden der Zwischenkriegszeit, sondern, in dieser Tradition stehend, eigenständige Entwicklungen vollbracht hat.

Die Neuen Tendenzen beruhten auf einer Verbindung aus einer kritischen, politisch engagierten künstlerischen Praxis mit einem positivem, allerdings nicht eindimensionalem Verhältnis zu Technologie und Wissenschaft. Dass diese zwei Dinge als zusammengehörig gedacht werden können ist heute gar nicht mehr so selbstverständlich. New Tendencies Mitbegründer Almir Mavignier war damals an der Hochschule für Gestaltung Ulm tätig, wo er 1953 unter Max Bill zu studieren begonnen hatte. Ulm wurde damals als ein Neues Bauhaus bezeichnet und entwickelte unter dem Argentinier Tomas Maldonado eine extrem rationalistische, verwissenschaftlichte Design-Ideologie. Andere Quellen, aus denen sich dieses Nahverhältnis von Kunst und Technologie, Kunst und Wissenschaft speisten, waren die holländische De Stijl Gruppe und der russische Konstruktivismus und deren Zusammentreffen in Deutschland ca. 1922. So ist überliefert, dass einer der etwas älteren Vorbilder der Neuen Tendenzen, Jesus Rafael-Soto (neben Vasarely und Lucio Fontana) nach New York fuhr um Piet Mondrian zu besuchen. Soto soll gesagt haben, ich möchte ihre Bilder beschleunigen, worauf Mondrian antwortete: "aber meine Bilder sind bereits sehr schnell."

Ein weiterer wichtiger Punkt ist die Entstehung der Neuen Tendenzen an einem ganz bestimmtem Abschnitt der Nachkriegsgeschichte. Die erste Ausstellung der Neuen Tendenzen war zwar erst 1961, doch es gab eine wichtige Vorlaufzeit, die etwa ab Mitte der 1950er Jahre begann. Ein ganz wichtiger Punkt ist in dieser Hinsicht das Verhältnis zu den Verbrechen und industrialisierten Gräueltaten der Nazis einerseits und zu den damals dominanten Kunstformen, dem abstrakten Expressionismus, in Europa auch Informel oder Tachismus genannt. In der reduktiven Logik des Kalten Krieges wurde die freie, gestische Malerei eines Jackson Pollock mit Individualismus und westlichem Liberalismus identifiziert, und der Sozialistische Realismus mit dem Massenmenschem Sowjetregime. In diese binäre Logik haben die Neuen Tendenzen eine große Bresche geschlagen.

Dazu muss man wissen, dass erstens, das ehemalige Jugoslawien nicht Teil des Ostblocks war. Schon 1948 kam es zum Bruch zwischen Stalin und Tito, in dessen Folge Jugoslawien eine eigene, bewusst anti-stalinistische Ideologie entwickelte, die auf dem Konzept der Selbstverwaltung beruhte, eine Ideologie der dezentralen Selbstorganisation aller Teile der Gesellschaft; was dazu führte dass, zweitens, auch die Kunst in den Genuss der Selbstverwaltung kam, es also keine von oben verordnete Linie gab, so dass sich ab den 1950er Jahren modernistische Tendenzen entwickelten, die z.B. in Zagreb an gewisse konstruktivistische und auch dadaistische Vorläufer der Zwischenkriegszeit anschließen konnten; und drittens, führten diese Entwicklungen dazu dass Jugoslawien Gründungsmitglied, gemeinsam Mit Indien, Indonesien und Ägypten des Blocks der Blockfreien war, alles Staaten also, die sich eben erst von imperialistischer Vorherrschaft befreit hatten und nun nach einem „dritten Weg“ suchten, einem Mittelweg zwischen Kapitalismus und Kommunismus.

Aus all diesen drei Gründen also konnten sich die Nove Tendencije in Jugoslawien entwickeln, doch war es keine jugoslawische, sondern eine extrem internationalistische Künstlerbewegung, die auf dem blockfreien Boden gedeihen konnte. Nach der ersten Ausstellung 1961 kam es zu einer zweiten Ausstellung in Zagreb 1963, ein extrem kurzer Zeitraum, innerhalb dessen die Neuen Tendenzen nicht nur zahlenmäßig gewaltig anwuchsen, sondern auch eine eigene Programmatik der künstlerischen Forschung entwickelten. 1963 kam es auch zur Konsekrierung der Neuen Tendenzen am internationalen Kongress der Kritiker durch die damals hervorragendsten europäischen Kritiker, Giulio Carlo Argan, Rom, Pierre Restany, Paris und Aguilera Cerni, Madrid. Es folgte eine gemeinsame, große Ausstellung im Musee des Arts Decoratifs in Paris und die Teilnahme wesentlicher New Tendencies Künstler an der Ausstellung The Responsive Eye, 1965 in New York.

Diese Ausstellung wurde nicht nur als erster Blockbuster der modernen Kunst bezeichnet, sondern brachte auch die Begriffe Kinetic Art und Op Art in den öffentlichen Diskurs. Von den stärker politisch motivierten Künstlerinnen und Künstlern der New Tendenices wurde diese Ausstellung allerdings als „Begräbnis erster Klasse“ wahrgenommen. Insbesondere durch den Begriff der Op Art, mit dem diese Kunst zum Konkurrenten der Pop Art aufgebaut werden sollte, wurden nur die oberflächlichsten Charakteristika ihrer Kunst wahrgenommen, auf Kosten der politischen Motive, welche diese Künstler angetrieben haben.

Was waren aber die politischen Motive dieser Kunst, die sich oberflächlich recht hermetisch-neutral präsentierte? Dazu müssen wir nochmal zurückgehen in diese Nachkriegsära. Für Michel Tapié, den Papst des Informel und Tachismé hatten die Greuel der Nazizeit das Erbe der europäischen Aufklärung, ja die Grundfesten der Moderne ins Wanken gebracht. Die Kunst konnte sich an keinerlei überkommene Formen mehr halten, alles was noch gelten konnte war die ungefilterte, spontane Expressivität des Künstlers.

Für die Neuen Tendenzen war es jedoch genau umgekehrt. Sie folgten der von Georg Lukacs im Buch „Die Zerstörung der Vernunft – der Weg des Irrationalismus von Schelling zu Hitler“ vorgegebenen Linie. Lukacs identifizierte den Nationalsozialismus mit Irrationalismus – mit dem Unhinterfragten Glauben an Intuition, Genie, das Schaffen von Mythen – und erledigte damit in einem Aufwaschen eine ganze Reihe idealistischer Philosophien, von Schopenhauer über Kierkegaard und Nietzsche bis hin zum Vitalismus Bergsons und der deutschen Lebensphilosophie.

Für die Künstler der Neuen Tendenzen bedeutete das „Niemals Wieder“ gegenüber dem Faschismus eine Abkehr vom Künstler als Genie durch die Entwicklung einer sich auf wissenschaftliche Methoden beziehenden, forschenden künstlerischen Praxis. Diese visuelle künstlerische Forschung wurde vor allem in Künstlergruppen oder Kollektiven gepflegt. Diese Gruppen bezogen sich auf eine Neue Ethik des kollektiven Lebens, was sich auch dahingehend auswirkte, dass Arbeiten kollektiv signiert wurden, oder überhaupt anonym nur mit dem Gruppennamen, wie zum Beispiel bei den Spaniern Equipo 57, den Franzosen und Lateinamerikanern von Group de Recherche d'Art Visuel, kurz GRAV, und der radikalen sozialistische italienischen Gruppe N, nach dem Buchstaben N, auch ausgesprochen Enne. Daneben gab es aber auch einen anderen Strang in den Neuen Tendenzen, verkörpert durch die deutsche Gruppe Zero und deren holländischen Ableger Nul, die es als ihr Hauptziel sahen, den Menschen durch die Entwicklung einer neuen Ästhetik von den Konventionen des Denkens zu befreien.

Diese Ethik des kollektiven Lebens zeichnete sich auch dadurch aus, dass die Künstlerinnen und Künstler der Neuen Tendenzen mittels der visuellen Forschung eine neue Ästhetik für alle schaffen wollten. Ein Kernbegriff ist hier die „planetare Folklore“ von Vasarely, eine Ästhetik, die auch Menschen ohne künstlerische Vorbildung unmittelbar ansprechen sollte.

Den zeithistorischen Hintergrund bildete die von Amerika ausgehende, neue Welle der Industrialisierung auf Basis neuer Technologien der Automatisierung. In den Autofabriken von Detroit und Michigan, aber auch in den FIAT-Werken und bei Olivetti in Norditalien schlug ein neues, elektronisches Herz. Durch kybernetische Techniken der Steuerung mittels Feedback und Information erlangte die Automatisierung eine neue Qualitätsstufe des Charakters der Maschine.

Diese Entwicklung fußte auf einer Dialektik, die einerseits mehr Menschen zu mehr Wohlstand verhalf, zugleich aber die Entfremdung und Vereinzelung des Menschen in der Gesellschaft der Massenproduktion und des Massenkonsums auf ein neues Niveau brachte. Die Neuen Tendenzen waren überzeugt, dass eine progressive künstlerische Praxis sich vor diesen Entwicklungen nicht verstecken durfte. Ihr wichtigstes Ziel war deshalb, die Betrachterin, den Betrachter zum Mitgestalter des Werks zu machen und so die Subjekt-Objekt-Schranke zwischen Werk und Betrachter aufzuheben. Lange vor Nicholas Bourriaud, der den Begriff der relationalen Kunst populär machte, war dieses neuen Beziehungsgefüge ein ganz zentraler Punkt für die Neuen Tendenzen.

Ein Beispiel um diesen Gedanken zu illustrieren: 1962 wurden einige der wichtigsten italienischen und französischen Vertreter eingeladen, an einer Ausstellung finanziert von der Büromaschinenfirma Olivetti teilzunehmen. Das Sponsoring durch Olivetti ermöglichte es, zahlreiche dieser Arten von Maschinen herzustellen, die auch in dieser Ausstellung zu sehen sind, man denke zum Beispiel an Gianni Colombo. Die Ausstellung erhielt den schönen Titel „arte programmata“, die programmierte Kunst.

Den Katalogtext schrieb niemand geringerer als der kürzlich verstorbene Umberto Eco. In diesem Text, mehr oder weniger zeitgleich verfasst mit Ecos berühmtem kunsttheoretischem Text „Opera Aperta“, das offene Kunstwerk, sprach Eco davon, dass die programmierte Kunst in Gestalt dieser von Elektromotoren angetriebenen Maschinen ein Spiel von Ordnung und Zufall erzeugen würde, und somit ein Feld von Möglichkeiten zwischen Werk und Betrachter. Das Werk ist also nicht das Objekt für sich genommen, sondern die Gesamtheit der Konstellation Werk und Betrachter und der Interaktionen, die sich daraus ergeben. Ecos These, die man als eine Art Grundthese für die gesamten Neuen Tendenzen ansehen kann, war, dass die Betrachter, indem sie zu Benutzern werden, ihr eigenes kritisches Handlungspotenzial entdecken und dieses neu gefundene Wissen und Potenzial auch auf das Alltagsleben übertragen.

Der schnelle Siegeszug der Neuen Tendenzen bis nach New York, das neue Zentrum der Kunstwelt, wurde bereits vermerkt. 1966 erhielt Julio LeParc den ersten Preis der Biennale von Venedig, 1967 folgte die Kinetika in Wien. Dabei ist es höchst interessant, welche Deutung der österreichische Kunsthistoriker Otto Antonia Graf den Neuen Tendenzen gab. In seinem Katalogtext für Kinetika stellte er zunächst den Bezug auf das Konstruktionsschema maurischer Ornamente her. Für Graf beruhten die Neuen Tendenzen auf einem „Ende der Unterscheidung von Grund und Muster“, einer „Ausschaltung des Tiefenraums.“ Illustriert wurden diese Textpassagen durch Mosaiken aus der Alhambra in Granada.

Tatsächlich war es so, dass einer der wichtigsten Künstler dieser Bewegung, Francois Morellet, Anfang der 1950er Jahre nach Südspanien gefahren ist und sich von der maurischen Kunst inspirieren hat lassen; ähnlich auch Almir Mavignier, der unmittelbar vor der ersten New Tendencies Ausstellung eine Studienreise nach Ägypten unternahm.

In einem weiteren Schritt geht Graf auf die Subjekt-Spannung zwischen Werk und Betrachter ein; in meiner eigenen Arbeit1 wird dieses Verhältnis in Analogie zwischen Vordergrund / Werk und Hintergrund / historischer Kontext betrachtet. Den philosophischen Kontext, der in meinem Buch ausführlich erläutert wird, liefert eine durch Marx gefilterte, hegelianische Geschichtsphilosophie.

Diese wurde damals von den Philosophen der Praxis-Gruppe in Zagreb und Belgrad gepflegt, die das Praxis-Magazin herausgaben und von 1963 bis 1974 die Korcula Summer School organisierten. Dabei handeltes es sich weltweit um da wichtigste Treffen der philosophischen Neuen Linken, mit Größen wie Herbert Marcuse, Ernst Bloch oder Herni Lefebvre. In deren Hegel-Interpretation nimmt der Begriff der Tendenz eine zentrale Rolle ein. Frei nach Hegel geht eine Gesellschaft mit der zukünftigen schwanger. Für lange Zeit ist das den meisten Menschen kaum bewusst, die Tendenz ist, wenn überhaupt, kaum wahrnehmbar. Erst wenn die Umstände reif sind, kommt es zu einem plötzlichem schnellen Umschlagen – zur Revolution. Wenn wir uns die Werke in dieser Ausstellung ansehen, dann erscheinen viel wie eine Illustration eines solchen tendenziösen Tendenzbegriffs – die Werk haben einen Umschlagpunkt. Otto Antonia Graf stellte aber in diesem Zusammenhang die zentrale Frage zum Verhältnis von Kunst, Technologie und geschichtlichem Telos:

„Der Künstler skizziert eine Welt, in der die Deformationen des Industrialismus und der Technologie beseitigt, Technologie und Dynamik aber zu geistbefreienden, künstlerischen Gestalten erhoben und verklärt werden können. Kunst ist die Apotheose der Wissenschaft.“

Für Graf und auch für mich, behandelte die Kunst der Neuen Tendenzen nicht nur ästhetische und formale Fragen sondern globale Probleme. Die „planetarische Folklore“ Vasarely's zielte auf eine ästhetisch durchgestaltete Lebenswelt als Korrektiv gegen die zerstörerischen Einflüsse der technisch-industriellen Existenz. In dieser Welt sollte Kunst als irdisches Paradiesversprechen für alle wirksam werden, frei nach Ernst Bloch:

„Ohne Kunst, gestaltende Ordnung und Schönheit für alle ist Gesellschaft unmöglich.“

Ohne Kunst, Brudermord, Krieg, Faschismus. Grafs tiefe Genealogie erhebt das Ornament zur "Seelenmassage" und begreift die Kinetische Kunst nicht als Phänomen des 20.Jahrhunderts, sondern als eine Parallelgeschichte zur Malerei seit dem 16. Jahrhundert. Laut Graf sei Barock ohne Kinetik nicht zu denken. Von hier geht der Weg zu den „Molekularen Architekturen der Saint Simonisten, den mechanisierten Architekturen, den Weltausstellungen, Film, Licht.“

Dahinter steht die Hoffnung auf eine einheitliche zivilisatorische Formgebung, auf dem Finden einer neuen Balance von technischer Existenz – mit all den fürchterlichen Dingen welche diese hervorbringt und einer der menschlichen Phänomenologie adäquaten Sinneserfahrung; gesucht wurde ein dynamisches Equilibrium, das auch schon der Architekturhistoriker Siegfried Giedion gefordert hat.

In Mechanization Takes Command hatt Giedion eine „anonyme Kulturgeschichte“ geschrieben. Damit verbunden ist, um wieder zu Graf zurückzukehren, „eine kopernikanische Wende," in folge der der Mensch nicht mehr statisch und anthropozentrisch im Mittelpunkt steht, sondern in einem dynamischem Verhältnis mit Umwelt und Universum. Das bedeutet auch das Ende der Priviligierung der Subjekte über die Objekte.

Diese kopernikanische Wende, konstatiert von Graf 1967, ist etwas, das immer noch vor sich geht, zum Beispiel in der neueren Philosophie des New Materialism, des Speculative Realism oder auch Post-Object-Philosophie deren gemeinsamer Fluchtpunkt die Aufhebung der Subjekt-Objektschranke ist, ein Punkt der Intervention an dem genau die Kunst der neuen Tendenzen ansetzt. Die Vermittlung zwischen der konkreten, individuellen Erfahrung des Menschen oder Künstlers und der geschichtlichen Tendenz, die von Technologie geprägt ist, war die selbstgestellte Aufgabe dieser enorm wichtigen und leider fast vergessenen künstlerischen Bewegung. Diese Aufgabe erscheint mir gerade heute von ungebrochener Aktualität. Die Technologie ist nicht unser Feind, sondern die irrationalistischen Fantasien, die sich ihrer zu bedienen hoffen, um einen neuen nietzscheanischen technologischen Übermensch zu erschaffen. Doch genau das wollen wir hoffentlich nicht.

  • 1. Siehe dazu mein Buch: New Tendencies – Art at the Threshold of the Information Revolution (1961 – 1978), MIT Press (2016) http://www.newtendencies.eu/

by Armin Medosch

May 05, 2016

Riccardo Orioles

Pino Maniaci, caro amico: riprenditi dall’ubriacatura e torna come prima

Masaniello, Pancho Villa, il contadino o il brigante che dopo anni di ribellione viene infine scoperto dai nobili, dalla corte. “Ha visto com’è spontaneo, don Alonzo? Mangia colle mani! Es un hombre del pueblo, poco da fare…”. “È un campesino, si vede. Un liberal campesino. Però potrebbe anche farsi la barba ogni giorno”. “Ed ecco a voi… Pino Maniaci! Il coraggioso giornalista di…”. “Di Partinico”. “Ecco, di Partinico! Nel cuore della Sicilia maffiosa! Ci dica, Maniaci, lei ha paura quando affronta la mafia?”. E Maniaci – e Pancho Villa, e Masaniello – risponde, come tutti si aspettano, con una parola volgare. “Eh eh – sorride il presentatùr – Pane al pane, eh? Scusate, amici telespettatori, ma stiamo parlando con un protagonista della lotta alla maffia… Uno che non bada certo a parlare da intellettuale…”. Altra malaparola di Masaniello (o di Pancho Villa, o di Maniaci), altro sorriso complice del presentatore. E lo spettacolo va avanti.

Ricatti e amori - Pino Maniaci era considerato un nuovo Impastato - Ansa

Francisco Arango Arambula, di San Juan del Rio, in realtà era uno dei migliori generali del Ejercito Republicano. Aveva cominciato con quattro compagni, poi dieci, poi cinquanta. Abilissimo tattico, uno dopo l’altro aveva sfasciato i battaglioni del dittatore, lassù nel Norte. E ora eccolo qua, nel Palazzo Presidencial, imbarazzato e felice, lisciandosi i baffoni e cercando di rispondere alle domande dei capi liberales con l’occhialino. (E anche Tommaso Aniello, come sindacalista e politico, non era poi tanto male. L’unico, in tutta Napoli, a capire che la gabella sul pesce era la chiave di tutto, che là si doveva insistere, coprendosi con “Viva el Rey” ma senza mollare un momento). Pino Maniaci è uno dei migliori cronisti che ho conosciuto, e ne ho conosciuti un bel po’.

“Dilettante” all’inizio, ma rapidamente cresciuto, e all’antica, in questo mestiere. Uno che è in giro all’alba, per colline e campagne, per prendere i particolari, non solo le grandi linee, dell’ultimo omicidio o di una cronachetta qualunque. E buona capacità, anche, di coordinare un’inchiesta grossa, di mettere insieme dati, di trarne conclusioni razionali (la dottoressa Saguto ne sa qualcosa). E ora eccolo qui, insieme a los generales e ai marchesi, coccolato e schernito (ma elegantemente): “Don Pancho!”, “Excellencia!”, “Gran Maniaci!”. Finché un bel giorno – come Tommaso Aniello, come Francisco – è scasato di testa. Come la nobiltà, del resto, pazientemente aspettava.

È una storia di poveri. Decine o centinaia di euro, banconote e monete, raccolte senza osar crederci, impaurito e spavaldo. “Hai finito di stentare”, dice alla donna. Potrà lavare i pavimenti a trecento euro al mese, una ricchezza. “Hai visto? Fanno quello che voglio! Comando io!”. È un nobile pure lui adesso, uno che può afferrare le cose, può comandare. Così fanno i signori, i ricchi della città, i generali, gli avvocati. E così, se dio vuole, faremo pure noialtri, d’ora in avanti. Ce lo siamo meritato. Inizia la breve ricchezza, la povera ricchezza, soldini di rame e di tolla (ma ai poveri pare oro sonante) del campesino Francisco, del pescatore Masaniello. “Comando io!”. E i nobili, con pazienza, aspettano allegramente il passo falso. “Avete visto? – si preparano a dire – Don Montante, el senor Costanzo, il barone Lo Bello: v’incazzavate con loro, voi communisti, ma in fondo che cos’è mai successo? Chi vede quattrini se li piglia, e voi non siete meglio degli altri: guardate il vostro eroe, che cos’ha fatto!”. Così i milioni dei ricchi si confondono colle quattro monete dei poveracci: tutta roba rubata, tutta la stessa cosa.

“Vi prego, voi velocisti, telegiornali, giornali vari, che mai avete fatto inchieste… Che fate servizi fiume sull’eroe antimafia decaduto, e ci godete. Noi siamo i ragazzi di Telejunior. In quelle stanze di Telejato ci abbiamo passato giornate intere. A impappinarsi nel registrare i servizi, a fare le rassegne stampa, a montare. In giro a fare domande, a Borgetto, a San Giuseppe Jato, al tribunale di Palermo. I vostri coltelli feriscono, fanno un male che nemmeno vi immaginate. Ma io devo fare scudo. Con gli occhi gonfi, la nausea che va e viene, il naso rosso paonazzo. Io devo fare scudo ai miei ragazzi, ai ragazzi di Telejunior. Io Michela, e Salvo e Arianna e Danilo, e Marco, Ivano, Eleonora, Pasquale e Giulia e tutti gli altri”. Un altro ragazzo, un militante, da Milano: “Da me su Maniaci non avrete parole, solo dolore”.

Telejato deve continuare. Come la lotta contro la gabella a Napoli, come la tierra y liberdad dei contadini. Con Masaniello, con Pancho Villa, dopo Pancho Villa, dopo Masaniello. Perché siamo noi questa lotta, noi popolo, noi banda di disperati. Non un singolo capo, che prima o poi può crollare. Voi nobili, voi giornalisti importanti, guardate solo ai capi. Ma noi abbiamo vissuto un’altra storia, un’altra grande speranza e sofferenza. Noi siamo qui, noi non molliamo. Caro Pino, rimettiti dall’ubriacatura, ingollati “sto caffè” e torna com’eri prima. In culo alla nobiltà e a tutto il gran giornalismo italiano: noi siamo viddani zappaterra, non baroneddi. Ce ne fottiamo di comandare, non c’interessa diventare come loro, vivere è ciò che ci piace. Ti aspetto e ti stringo la mano.
(Fino a un minuto fa, altro che stretta di mano, volevo salutarti con un calcio nel sedere. Ma abbiamo cavalcato insieme, stracciati e miserabili ma orgogliosi. Gliene abbiamo date, ai signori. E torneremo a dargliene. Forza, un altro caffè, tutto d’un fiato. Ti aspetto).

Collega Letizia, aspetto i suoi ordini. Lei è la mia nuova direttrice. Telejato continua, non c’è bisogno di dirlo. Mi spiace per lorsignori, ma si va avanti. Sono già al computer, mi dica cosa debbo fare.

“Perché, la storia di Telejato, e di tutti noi ragazzi, non si può cancellare così. Siamo tutti stretti l’uno all’altro, e rimarremo in questo modo, qualunque sia il pensiero di ciascuno, qualunque emozione. Qualunque cosa accada. Uniti. Insieme”.

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by Riccardo Orioles